GET IN THE WAY of certain HPV-related cancers

Discuss With Your Child's Doctor About HPV Vaccination
Discuss With Your Child's Doctor About HPV Vaccination

HPV (human papillomavirus) is about cancer.

For most people, HPV clears on its own.

HPV is a common virus that can lead to certain cancers in both males and females later in life. Sons and daughters. Yes—even your child, later in life.

HPV Can Affect Males and Females

It’s your time to act.

HPV vaccination is a type of cancer prevention.

Talk to your child’s doctor about certain HPV-related cancers, and vaccinate before exposure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends routine HPV vaccination for both males and females at age 11 or 12.

The CDC Recommends HPV Vaccination for Both Males and Females at Age 11 or 12
The CDC Recommends HPV Vaccination for Both Males and Females at Age 11 or 12
 

HPV. IT' ABOUT CANCER.

Human papillomavirus can cause certain cancers later in life.

Get ahead of it.

Talk to your child’s doctor.

Your chance to help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers later in life is at their next visit.

HPV and Cancer HPV and Cancer
Each Year, There are Tens of Thousands of New Cancer Cases That Could Have Been Caused by HPV Each Year, There are Tens of Thousands of New Cancer Cases That Could Have Been Caused by HPV Each year, there are tens of thousands of new cancer cases that could have been caused by HPV.

HPV. IT CAN BE ERIOU.

Because it can lead to certain cancers later in life.

And, since HPV often has no signs or symptoms, anyone who has the virus can pass it on without even knowing it.

As a parent, it may be surprising to learn that your child can be exposed to HPV through adolescent sexual experimentation with someone who has HPV.

An Estimated 79 Million People in the United States Are Infected With HPV An Estimated 79 Million People in the United States Are Infected With HPV

people in the United States are infected with HPV.

For most people, HPV clears on its own. But for others who don’t clear the virus, it can cause certain cancers later in life. There is no way to know which people who have HPV will develop cancer or other health problems.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

HPV vaccination is a type of cancer prevention.

Remember, HPV can have serious consequences. But you can help get ahead of certain HPV-related cancers by talking to your child’s doctor today.

Vaccinate before exposure.

The CDC recommends routine vaccination for both males and females at age 11 or 12.

Routine Vaccination Recommended for Both Males and Females at Age 11 or 12
Routine Vaccination Recommended for Both Males and Females at Age 11 or 12

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There’s more to learn before your son or daughter’s next visit.

Frequently Asked Questions About HPV

Be an in-the-know parent

Now that you understand HPV (human papillomavirus) and its potential health impact, you may have additional questions.

Reviewing the HPV FAQs below is a great place to start.

HPV Questions

No, there is currently no specific treatment that treats HPV infection.

Talk to your child’s doctor to learn how to help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers that may develop later in life.

Exposure to HPV can happen with any kind of adolescent sexual experimentation with someone who has HPV.

While your child may not be at risk now, it’s important to learn how you can help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers that may develop later in life.

For most people, HPV clears on its own. But for others who don't clear the virus, it could cause certain cancers later in life.

HPV infection often has no visible signs or symptoms. Anyone who has the virus can pass it on without knowing it.

The CDC recommends routine HPV vaccination for boys and girls at age 11 or 12.

Yes, males can get HPV and pass it on too.

HPV can cause certain cancers later in life in both males and females.

LEARN MORE
HPV Questions
 

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