•  
    MYTH
     
    There's nothing serious about HPV.
    GET THE FACT
    FACT  

    HPV. It's about certain cancers.

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has potentially serious consequences—as in cancer-serious. Some types of this virus can lead to certain cancers and diseases later in life for both males and females.

    SCROLL DOWN TO LEARN MORE

    What can you do about it?

    To learn more about the potential consequences of HPV, ask your doctor or health care professional. Together, you can decide the best way to help protect against certain HPV-related cancers and diseases.

    HPV Statistics

    About 50% of new genital HPV infections occur in 15- to 24-year-olds each year.

    For most people, HPV clears on its own. But, for others who don't clear the virus, it could cause certain cancers and other diseases.

  •  
    MYTH
     
    HPV is no big deal. It always clears on its own.
    HPV is no big deal. It always clears on its own.
    GET THE FACT
    FACT  

    For most people, HPV clears on its own. But for others who don't clear the virus, it could lead to certain cancers and other diseases.

    About 14 million people get human papillomavirus (HPV) infections every year in the United States.

    SCROLL DOWN TO LEARN MORE

    Boy or girl, HPV can affect your child later in life.

    HPV is a virus that can infect both males and females. This means that your son or daughter may be at risk for getting certain HPV-related cancers and diseases in the future.

    Future Risk for Certain HPV-Related Cancers and Diseases

    In the United States, about 19,000 teens and young adults* get HPV each day.

    *15- to 24-year-olds

    Exposure to HPV can happen with any kind of adolescent experimentation that involves genital contact with someone who has HPV—intercourse isn't necessary, but it is the most common way to get the virus.

     

    How can you help protect your child?

    Ask your child's doctor or health care professional about HPV and its potentially serious consequences. He or she is an excellent resource when it comes to your child's health. Learn more here.

  •  
    MYTH
     
    Guys? They can't even get HPV.
    GET THE FACT
    FACT  

    Actually, HPV can infect
    guys, too.

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) doesn't only infect females. Males can get the virus as well. That's why it's important for every parent to learn about the consequences of HPV.

    SCROLL DOWN TO LEARN MORE

    How can I help protect my son or daughter?

    HPV can cause certain cancers and diseases later in life for both men and women. That's why the best time to help protect your child is before they are exposed to the virus.

    Males and Females Are at Risk for HPV-Related Anal Cancer
     

    Want to know more? Ask your child's doctor.

    If you have questions about HPV, talk to your child's doctor or health care professional today. Together, you can decide the best way to help protect your child.

  •  
    MYTH
     
    My child is only a preteen.
    There's no rush.
    GET THE FACT
    FACT  

    By acting now, you can help protect your child later.

    While your child may not be at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) now, their risk for getting the virus increases as they get older. Learn now about HPV and how to protect your child before they're exposed to the virus.

    SCROLL DOWN TO LEARN MORE

    Parents, it may be time to take action.

    Talk to your child's doctor or health care professional today. Together, you can decide the best way to help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers and diseases.

     

    While your child may not engage in sex today, you can help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers and diseases later in life.

    HPV. It’s personal.

 
 
MYTH
  There's nothing serious about HPV.
FACT
  HPV. It's about certain cancers.
SHOW MORE 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) has potentially serious consequences—as in cancer-serious. Some types of this virus can lead to certain cancers and diseases later in life for both males and females.

What can you do about it?

To learn more about the potential consequences of HPV, ask your doctor or health care professional. Together, you can decide the best way to help protect against certain HPV-related cancers and diseases.

HPV Statistics

About 50% of new genital HPV infections occur in 15- to 24-year-olds each year.

For most people, HPV clears on its own. But, for others who don't clear the virus, it could cause certain cancers and other diseases.

 
MYTH
  HPV is no big deal. It always clears on its own.
FACT
  For most people, HPV clears on its own. But for others who don't clear the virus, it could lead to certain cancers and other diseases.
SHOW MORE 

About 14 million people get human papillomavirus (HPV) infections every year in the United States.

Boy or girl, HPV can affect your child later in life.

HPV is a virus that can infect both males and females. This means that your son or daughter may be at risk for getting certain HPV-related cancers and diseases in the future.

Potential Risk for Certain HPV-Related Cancers and Diseases

In the United States, about 19,000 teens and young adults* get HPV each day.

*15- to 24-year olds

Exposure to HPV can happen with any kind of adolescent experimentation that involves genital contact with someone who has HPV—intercourse isn't necessary, but it is the most common way to get the virus.

 

How can you help protect your child?

Ask your child's doctor or health care professional about HPV and its potentially serious consequences. He or she is an excellent resource when it comes to your child’s health. Learn more here.

 
MYTH
HPV Often Has No Signs or Symptoms in Males and Females
  Guys? They can't even get HPV.
FACT
  Actually, HPV can infect guys, too.
SHOW MORE 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) doesn't only infect females. Males can get the virus as well. That's why it’s important for every parent to learn about the consequences of HPV.

How can I help protect my son or daughter?

HPV can cause certain cancers and diseases later in life for both men and women. That's why the best time to help protect your child is before they’re exposed to the virus.

Males and Females Are at Risk for HPV-Related Anal Cancer and Genital Warts
 

Want to know more? Ask your child's doctor.

If you have questions about HPV, talk to your child's doctor or health care professional today. Together, you can decide the best way to help protect your child.

 
MYTH
  My child is only a preteen. There's no rush.
FACT
  By acting now, you can help protect your child later.
SHOW MORE 

While your child may not be at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) now, their risk for getting the virus increases as they get older. Learn now about HPV and how to protect your child before they’re exposed to the virus.

Parents, it may be time to take action.

Talk to your child's doctor or health care professional today. Together, you can decide the best way to help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers and diseases.

 

While your child may not engage in sex today, you can help protect your child from certain HPV-related cancers and diseases later in life.

HPV. It’s personal.


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